Everything Bagel Cheeseball

Everything Bagels are always a favorite at the Cheese Shop.  Here we carried the same wonderful combination of flavors to a cheese ball.  I served this to a group of teenagers who devoured it and begged for more!

 

EVERYTHING BAGEL CHEESEBALL

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Cheeseball Ingredients

  • 8 ounces Appel Farms Quark, room temperature
  • 6 ounces Appel Farms Black Pepper Cheddar, coarsely shredded
  • 1 ounce Appel Farms Extra Sharp Cheddar, coarsely shredded
  • 8 ounces cream cheese, room temperature
  • 2 Tbsp chopped green onions
  • 6 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled

Topping Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp dehydrated onion
  • 2 Tbsp dry minced garlic
  • 2 Tbsp poppy seeds
  • 2 Tbsp sesame seeds
  • Salt to taste

Instructions

In a mixing bowl, mix together Quark, Cheddars, cream cheese, green onions, and bacon.

Form the cheese mixture into a ball and wrap it tightly in plastic wrap; chill in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours to let it harden a bit and the flavors to come together.  Even better, the cheeseball can be made the day before.

In another small bowl, mix together the topping ingredients.

Once cheeseball is set, roll it the topping mixture to completely cover.  Serve it with some bagel chips, crackers, pretzels, or fresh veggies.

PRINTABLE VERSION

Pumpkin Cheddar Rolls

Pumpkin Cheddar Rolls

ingredients:

  • 2 1/4 teaspoons (1 packet) instant yeast
  • 1 cup whole milk, scalded and cooled to lukewarm
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted 
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin puree, not pumpkin pie mix
  • 2 large eggs, divided
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups sharp cheddar, shredded
  • Sliced pecan pieces, for the “stems”

directions:

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment, stir the yeast, milk, sugar, butter, pumpkin, one egg, cheddar, and salt until well combined. Gradually add the flour and knead on medium-low speed until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl. Turn off the mixer and let the dough rest for 3 to 5 minutes. Continue to knead the dough on medium-low speed for another 5 minutes, or until the dough is soft and smooth. If it seems too sticky, add more flour, 1 tablespoon at a time.

Transfer the dough to a large greased bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rise until doubled in size, about 45 minutes to 1 hour.

Punch the dough down and turn it out onto a lightly floured work surface. Divide the dough into 15 equal pieces and shape into balls. Use the palm of your hand to flatten each ball slightly. With a small knife, cut 8 slices around each ball, being careful not to slice all the way into the center, to make the pumpkin shape. Cover and let rise until doubled in size, about 45 minutes to 1 hour.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350°F. Using the wooden end of a small utensil or your finger to poke an indentation in the center of each roll to create a space for the “stem.” In a small bowl beat the remaining egg with 2 teaspoons of water and brush all over the rolls. Bake the rolls for 15 to 20 minutes, or until golden brown. Place a sliced pecan piece into the indentation of each roll.

Printable Version

Chicken Nachos

Chicken Nachos with Squeeze Cheese

John and I are not very good about entertaining people in our home.  I say “John and I” so that he can shoulder part of the blame, that’s what husbands are for, even when they are blameless.  I get nervous about entertaining partly due to never realizing my unrealistic expectations of being the next Martha Stewart and partly due to the fact that anything I serve will probably include a liberal seasoning of cat hair.  If I could get all the cat hair under control…and if I could overcome my feelings of inadequacy…and if we had a football party…this is what I would serve.

The Squeeze Cheese is a recipe that I have shared before but I am so in love with it that I had to share it again!  It is so fast and easy to make!  I like to keep a bottle in the fridge for those moments when I really need to squeeze some cheese on something.  That happens a lot.

I made these nachos for my family a couple of times recently.  Something like this is easy for Sunday afternoon snacks, whether there’s a game on or not.  I kept the chicken in a crockpot set on warm and everything else in bowls nearby.  This would also work with a big bowl of lettuce for a taco salad, if you are in the mood for that, but I wasn’t.

Chicken Nachos

Squeeze Cheese

Start by pouring 1 cup of whole milk in a small saucepan and sprinkle 1 teaspoon of gelatin over it to soften.  Let it soften for about 5 minutes, then heat slowly over low heat until the gelatin dissolves and the milk start to steam.  Do not boil the gelatin or it will not set!

Dissolve gelatin in milk

 

Shred 6 ounces of Appel Farms Cheddar or Gouda in a food processor.  I used Jalapeno Gouda for one sauce and Sharp Cheddar for the second.  Depending on what you are making, there’s tons of flavor choices!

Grated Jalapeno Gouda

Turn the food processor on low and slowly drizzle the hot milk mixture into the cheese.  Keep it running until the cheese is melted and very smooth, about 30-60 seconds.

Pour warm milk onto Jalapeno Gouda

Blend Gouda and Milk

 

It is just that easy, can you believe it?  Immediately pour the mixture into two 8 ounce squeeze bottles.  The bottles are available at craft stores in the candy making section.  The sauce will start to set up right away, so you need to be quick!

Pour cheese sauce into bottles

The squeeze cheese will flow at room temperature, but is too stiff when chilled.  Trust me, I know.  Store in the refrigerator.

Chicken Mixture

Place 1 pound cooked shredded chicken breast in a large saucepan.  Confession time: I cook and shred chicken in large batches to keep in the freezer.  This chicken was previously frozen.  I’m not Martha Stewart.

Cooked shredded chicken

Sprinkle on one packet of your favorite taco seasoning.

Add taco seasoning to chicken

Pour on 8 ounces of tomato sauce and 1 cup water.

Add tomato sauce and water to the chicken.

Stir it all together and heat on low for 15-20 minutes.  Continue to heat and stir until the sauce thickens.  If it get too dry, add more water.

Stir and heat the taco mixture

While the taco mixture is simmering, go ahead and chop up your toppings.  Whatever you like on your nachos!  Go wild!  Have fun!  You can’t go wrong!

Chop up toppings

Now you can put the chicken mixture into a crockpot and let people make their own nachos, or make a big plate to share.  Throw on whatever you like.  Go wild! Have fun!  You can’t go wrong!  Unless you put avocado on mine, that’s wrong.

Building a plate of nachos. Step one: the chips

I know what you are thinking, those aren’t the right napkins for this year’s Super Bowl.  I’m not bitter at our team losing, those are the napkins that I happened to have in my cupboard.

Building a plate of nachos. Step two: toppings

Okay, maybe a little bitter.  I did have white napkins too.

Time for the Squeeze Cheese…

Building a plate of nachos. Step three: Squeeze Cheese

…and more Squeeze Cheese!

Building a plate of nachos. Step three: Squeeze Cheese

I thinned some sour cream with water and poured it in a squeeze bottle as well.  If I were smart, I would have labeled the bottles, but surprises can be fun too.  Sprinkle on cilantro if you like.

Building a plate of nachos. Step four: sour cream and cilantro

ENJOY!

Chicken Nachos with Squeeze Cheese

Cheddar – PART TWO: The Magic

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Where did we leave off again? *Reads past blog, laughs at my own jokes.* The last thing we did was admire the “cheddaring” process, which is fusion and stretching of the curds which causes that beautiful strength and elasticity. At the tail-end of that stretching and stacking process, we start to check the acidity levels of the cheese. Too low of a pH in the cheese can cause bitterness and an acidic taste. Too high of a pH level can inhibit the flavor intensity and gives ground to odd flavors. The pH at this stage also affects the texture of the cheddar further down the line. So how we check the acidity levels is MAGIC. Some people may try to tell you that its “math” and “science,” but friends, don’t believe them. Don’t be swayed by their over-simplification of a divine process. HAH. Just kidding, it is like super sciency, I just understand literally 0% of it. You guys are probably wondering, “why is she trying to explain something she knows absolutely nothing about?” Good question. I think my answer to your query would fall somewhere between “BECAUSE I’M WITTY” and “BECAUSE I CAN.” Take your pick.

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SO first we collect a little sample of the whey that is being expelled from the curds. It flows down like a little stream to the valve. We have this little measuring thing that we use to get the 10ml we need for the test. But we don’t get a cool little turkey-baster style one, or anything like that. No, that would be too convenient. Instead, it’s a fancy straw, so you suck the whey up into it and then pop your finger on top of it and let some drip out until it reaches the line of 10ml.

 

 

 

Stay on target.

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STAY

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ON TARGET

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YOU BLEW IT

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Got it.

We put that in our fancy little Petri dish (a hacked off bottom of a yogurt cup). Then we add five drops of this proplylshfmaihfinsdfn acid thing. It’s a “P” word, that’s all I know. Don’t worry about it, it’s not important. What IS important is this little dropper-vial it is in. I just want someone to walk me through their thought process with mending this thing. Literally just popped another dropper cap into the old one and was like “I FIXED IT.” I’m not even joking. And it has been that way for years now.  You may be starting to deduce that we are jimmy-riggers around here. Farmers, you know? If it works, it works. That’s all that matters.

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Here comes the magic. So into the 10ml of whey and the five drops of the propotatothylensene stuff and then we add NaOH which Google tells me is “Sodium Hydroxide.” Who knew, am I right? I know one of you just said “anyone who took any science class ever” and my answer to you is “BYE.” I was into theater, okay? Don’t judge me. So you know about Sodium Hydroxide, but can you literally *slay* all the songs from Oklahoma? I thought not. So sit down.

When the Sodium Hydroxide hits the whey and propenguinethelyne it goes full 1989 FUSCHIA. We add it bit by bit and when swirled around, it fades to a pale peach and then it is gone without a trace. MAGIC.

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We are shooting for a certain amount of Sodium Hydroxide to fade out to know when the pH is at a good point for those stretchy curd blocks to be milled. When it happens, it’s SHOWTIME.

So milling isn’t one of those “hold on, let me go get my phone and take a picture of this” kind of jobs. We actually have to work fairly quickly and throw the curd blocks in the machine to be chopped up, and then we have to move the curd around a bit so it doesn’t get tempted to fuse back together. So here is a picture of our mill after we milled all of it!

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Now we dry-salt the cheese curds. Now with a cheese like Gouda, for example, we form the wheels and then give it a two day brine-bath. With cheddar, you just throw salt on it like it’s your dinner plate. Not a little, and not from a mouse-shaped shaker (here’s looking at you Ruth…I mean Mom…) we are talking 7.5 pounds of salt in a bucket. So we salt it and stir and salt it again and stir and stir.

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At this point we dose it out into little half-pound containers for your instant gratification, or we pack it in our forms and it presses overnight for some dope cheddar in a few months. This would also be the stage when we would add dried garlic and dill for you herby-folks. And I’d love to tell you that there’s a special way of knowing how much to put in, but every week it is pretty much, “Ummm…I guess that’ll do.”

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NOTE: Never forget to up the pressure on your cheese presses. This is a very applicable life lesson. There needs to be PRESSURE on these babies. Like “you are an adult you should be able to make your own dentist appointments, Marlies” kind of pressure. Sorry, I guess I just needed to get that off my chest.

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ADULTING IS HARD. CHEDDAR IS COOL. HAVE A GOOD DAY!! Just gotta go wash the dill smell out of my hair and clothes now.

Creamy Cheddar Dressing

Creamy Cheddar Dressing on Summer Greens

The Harvest of the Month at Sustainable Connections for June is Salad Greens.  I decided to pair the salad greens with a chunky, creamy, cheddar salad dressing.  The creamy salad dressing is perfect with crisp salad greens fresh from local farms or the farmer’s market.

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Dressing ingredients

Creamy Cheddar Dressing

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 cup yogurt
  • 2 tablespoons milk (or more if dressing is too thick)
  • 4 ounces extra sharp cheddar
  • 1 small clove garlic, minced
  • 2 tablespoons fresh chives, finely chopped
  • Salt and Pepper to taste

In a medium bowl, whisk together the oil, lemon juice, and mustard.

Stir in the yogurt, milk, cheese, garlic, and chives.  Season with salt and pepper.

Chill for 20 minutes before serving.

**This makes a chunky dressing, if you prefer a smoother dressing, mix the ingredients in a blender or food processor.

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Adapted from a Cabot Cheese recipe

Cheese Soufflé

Cheese Souffle

There are a couple of things that my employees do for me that may not have been listed in the employee manual.  One is that they have to be able to read my mind.  I have a bad habit of not finishing my sentences, or starting in the middle of a thought.  Thankfully, I have a wonderful crew who just go with the flow and figure out what it is that I really mean, not necessarily what I say.

Another job skill not listed in the manual is posing for my photo manipulation hobby.  When the store is slow, you might find someone pretending to lean on a giant muffin or perched on a ladder.  I wonder if OSHA has any regulations against balancing my employees on a ladder.  I should probably look that up.

floating in the kitchen
Mars and Lindsey are flying

These people are also very tolerant of me saying, “here, grate some cheese for me!” then I snap a bunch of pictures while they smile and grate…and grate…and grate.  This week’s recipe is soufflé so we needed plenty of grated cheese.

We love the light airiness of the soufflé with it’s rich cheese flavor.  I started out using a wonderful recipe from my hero, Alton Brown, but over time I adapted it.  I especially wanted cheesier flavor, so I bumped up the cheese from one kind to three.  If you like a subtle cheese flavor, then you can cut it back to 6 ounces, but with cheese, more is definitely better.

Please note: My oven at the store is a professional convection oven.  No matter what I did, I couldn’t achieve the same lift on my soufflé that my oven at home does.  Your soufflé will look a lot nicer than mine!

Lots of cheese!
There is never too much cheese!

Cheese Soufflé

1/3 cup butter, cubed
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
2 cups whole milk
1 teaspoon dry mustard
a pinch of salt
Dash of hot pepper sauce
4 ounces (1 cup) shredded Maasdammer (or substitute Swiss cheese)
4 ounces (1 cup) shredded Cheddar
1 ounce (1/4 cup) shredded Aged Gouda
5 room temperature eggs, separated
½ teaspoon cream of tartar
1-2 tablespoons melted butter
2 tablespoons dry bread crumbs

Brush butter in ramekins or soufflé mold (I use 4 ounce ramekins for single serve dishes or 16 ounce soufflé molds for family style meals).  Add the bread crumbs to the ramekins and roll around so the butter and crumbs go up the sides.  Place in the refrigerator.

ramekins

In a small saucepan, melt butter over medium heat.  Stir in the flour until smooth; cook one minute.  Gradually whisk in the milk, dry mustard, hot sauce, salt, and pepper.  Bring to a boil, stirring constantly; cook and stir until thickened.  Reduce heat to medium-low; stir in cheeses until melted.  Transfer to a large bowl.

Preheat oven to 350.  In a small bowl, beat egg yolks until light colored and a creamy consistency.  Temper the yolks into the milk mixture, constantly whisking.

In a medium bowl, whisk the egg whites with cream of tartar on high speed until stiff but not dry.  Using 1/3 of the egg whites at a time, very gently fold the egg whites into the milk mixture.

filling

Remove the ramekins from the refrigerator and fill to ½ inch of the top.  Place ramekins on a cookie sheet and bake in the oven for 30 to 40 minutes, until tops are golden brown.  Serve immediately.

Cheese Souffle

Pumpkin Cheddar Rolls

Pumpkin Cheddar Rolls

It was 1986 and I was in college.  I started a job across town and didn’t have transportation so Gordon Kelly let me borrow his motor scooter for a couple of months until I could buy a car.  That was my favorite mode of transportation EVER.  I wore a leather James Dean jacket, black helmet, and even though I probably looked silly, I felt AWESOME.  That scooter couldn’t go faster than 35 mph but to me it was glorious.

Gordon and his wife Sadie are two of the most generous people that I have ever known. They are quiet, kind people who graciously give, never expecting anything in return.  I don’t think that I appreciated it nearly enough back then, but I haven’t forgotten how they took me in and blessed my life when I was away from home and family.

I will never forget the time Sadie handed me a HUGE rectangular block of cheddar cheese.  This thing was probably at least three pounds of orange gold.  Being single, it was an intimidating amount of cheese to consume.  I had cheddar on eggs for breakfast, grilled cheese sandwiches for lunch, and cheddar on pretty much anything for dinner.  I don’t understand the physics of it, but I think that I gained ten pounds on the scale from consuming three pounds of cheese.

I still love cheddar…

Pumpkin Cheddar Rolls

Pumpkin Cheddar Rolls

ingredients:

  • 2 1/4 teaspoons (1 packet) instant yeast
  • 1 cup whole milk, scalded and cooled to lukewarm
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted 
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin puree, not pumpkin pie mix
  • 2 large eggs, divided
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 cups sharp cheddar, shredded
  • Sliced pecan pieces, for the “stems”

directions:

In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment, stir the yeast, milk, sugar, butter, pumpkin, one egg, cheddar, and salt until well combined. Gradually add the flour and knead on medium-low speed until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl. Turn off the mixer and let the dough rest for 3 to 5 minutes. Continue to knead the dough on medium-low speed for another 5 minutes, or until the dough is soft and smooth. If it seems too sticky, add more flour, 1 tablespoon at a time.

Transfer the dough to a large greased bowl. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and let the dough rise until doubled in size, about 45 minutes to 1 hour.

Punch the dough down and turn it out onto a lightly floured work surface. Divide the dough into 15 equal pieces and shape into balls. Use the palm of your hand to flatten each ball slightly. With a small knife, cut 8 slices around each ball, being careful not to slice all the way into the center, to make the pumpkin shape. Cover and let rise until doubled in size, about 45 minutes to 1 hour.

pumpkin-cheddar-rolls

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350°F. Using the wooden end of a small utensil or your finger to poke an indentation in the center of each roll to create a space for the “stem.” In a small bowl beat the remaining egg with 2 teaspoons of water and brush all over the rolls. Bake the rolls for 15 to 20 minutes, or until golden brown. Place a sliced pecan piece into the indentation of each roll.

Adapted from a recipe by Handle the Heat

7 things you should know about our Squeaky Cheese!

If you are new to the land of cheese or are looking to get a loved one hooked,  you need to come in and try our Squeaky Cheese! Now, there is a chance you may not know what this noisy cheese is exactly, so I have compiled a list of a few things you really should know!

  1. Squeaky Cheese is a super fresh cheddar curd. When we make cheddar we separate a portion of it for squeaky cheese while the rest is pressed into rounds and aged for cheddar. 
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  2. Because of its freshness, it squeaks against your teeth when you eat it. This is how you can tell if your curd is truly fresh or not! 
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  3. We make it in two different flavors, plain, and garlic & dill!
  4. There are a few ways to enjoy your squeaky cheese, the most popular way (and easiest) is straight out of the cup! No slicing makes it the perfect low key, kid friendly, snack cheese.
  5. Personally, I think the best way to have squeaky cheese is battered and deep fried. Like a mozzarella stick, but SO much better! 
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  6. You can find this cheese in our store (of course!), all the Edaleen Dairy locations, as well as the Seattle Farmers Markets!
  7. For a few of the slower winter months we are on a bimonthly schedule, but for most of the year (including currently) we produce this treat every Thursday! If you really want to have squeaky cheese in its prime, pop into our store Thursdays after 4:00!

Once you know what it is and have tried it, you will not be able to live without it. I know because when you tell people the squeaky cheese is sold out, they melt into a puddle of misery. Okay, not quite, but it is pretty addicting! 😉

Quiche Two Ways

Quiche

I recently had the opportunity to go on a weekend trip with Karen Mullen Photography.  She is not only a fantastic photographer and consummate professional, but she is also an excellent teacher.  I’ve been in classes where her students had disparate levels of knowledge, from the woman who just received a camera as a gift and didn’t know anything about it, to the man who photographed professionally but wanted to hone his skills.  She helped each of us and easily switched from teaching beginner to advanced levels.  She also knew exactly what I needed to learn and gave me specific “assignments” geared to my individual needs.

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I was so happy with what I learned from her that I signed up for her “Leavenworth Photography Journey.”  If you are interested in photography, I highly recommend going on one of her Photography Journeys, you will not regret it.  She did a reconnaissance before the weekend so that no time was wasted.  We hopped from location to location with a variety of photo opportunities from a waterfall to mountains to night-time shots.  When we got back to the retreat, we pulled out our laptops and she gave lessons in Lightroom (for those who had the program), photo editing, and composition.  In case you are wondering, no, she did not pay me to say this!

Waterfall

I love to cook, so I offered to bring breakfast for the group on Sunday morning.  I chose Quiche since that is such an easy and flexible dish.

Wine Bottle rolling pin
It turns out that the place we were staying in didn’t have a rolling pin. I improvised with a wine bottle and plastic wrap.

The basic Quiche recipe is a blank canvas with endless possibilities for flavor combinations.  With the holidays coming up and overnight guests, Quiche is a quick, easy breakfast or light lunch.  I keep crust in my freezer (or you can buy pre-made if you prefer).  The basic recipe is just Quark and eggs, that’s it!  Then add your favorite combination of protein and/or vegetables and cheese.

Quiche

Bacon Cheddar Quiche

  • 1 nine inch pie crust
  • 1 pound Quark
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 cup Appel Farms Sharp Cheddar
  • 12 slices bacon, cooked and crumbled

Layer the bacon and cheddar in the bottom of the pie crust.  It will fill the crust but don’t worry.  Whisk together the Quark and eggs and pour over the cheddar and bacon.  Bake at 350 degrees for 45 – 50 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.  Allow the Quiche to rest for 15 minutes before serving or it will be runny.

Zucchini Sriracha and Maasdammer Quiche

-adapted from Will Cook for Smiles

  • 1 nine inch pie crust
  • 1 pound Quark
  • 4 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon sraracha sauce* (more or less depending on your taste)
  • 1 cup Appel Farms Maasdammer
  • 2 cups fresh or frozen shredded zucchini

If the zucchini was frozen, squeeze out extra moisture.  Layer the zucchini and Maasdammer in the bottom of the pie crust.  It will fill the crust but don’t worry.  Whisk together the Quark, sriracha, and eggs and pour over the zucchini.  Bake at 350 degrees for 45 – 50 minutes or until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean.  Allow the Quiche to rest for 15 minutes before serving or it will be runny.

*Sriracha is a Vietnamese hot chili sauce.  If you can’t find Sriracha, you can substitute your favorite hot sauce and adjust the amount depending on the heat level.

Fourth of July Picnic

John and I have been taking advantage of the nice weather and going on picnics on my day off. John starts work at 4am so we like to head to the park at 8 or 9am.  That makes it a late breakfast for me and lunchtime for him.  I thought it would be nice to come up with an easy stuffed sandwich that I could make the day before.  That way we could hop in the car as soon as John was done with his morning cheese chores.

John making feta
This is an old picture of John making feta. He doesn’t like having his picture taken so I have to sneak up on him.

I had my recipe books open which makes my son very happy.  I told him what I was looking for, he suggested using his favorite salad recipe.  This recipe was contributed to “A Taste of Tradition” Mt. View Church recipe book in 1998 by none other than my sister-in-law Ann.  We make this salad all the time as a light supper, especially during the summer.  Stuffing it into a loaf sandwich turned out perfect!

I also like this salad/sandwich because it uses three of our cheeses, Quark, Maasdammer, and Cheddar.  What’s not to love about that?

Elizabeth making cheddar
Making cheddar is a physically demanding job, just ask Elizabeth.

I do recommend choosing your bread carefully.  We loved the sourdough artisan loaf for flavor, but the chewy crust forced the filling to squish out a little bit.  It’s okay to get a little messy on a picnic, right?

Layered Basil Salad Sandwich

Layered Basil Salad Sandwich

  • Artisan bread loaf
  • 2 medium carrots, grated
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 1/2 cup quark*
  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper
  • Lettuce, shredded (the amount will vary depending on the size of the loaf)
  • 1/4-1/2 pound deli ham slices
  • 1/2 red onion, sliced thin
  • 1/4 cup Maasdammer** grated
  • 1/4 cup sharp cheddar, grated
  • 2 hard boiled eggs, sliced

Mix the carrots, peas, quark, mayonnaise, mustard, salt, and pepper in a small bowl.  Set aside.
Cut off the top third of the loaf and dig out the center, leaving an inch of crust to make a bowl.  Fill the bread bowl with lettuce all the way to the top, this layer will compress.  Layer the quark filling evenly over the lettuce, followed by the ham, red onions, cheeses, and eggs.
Cover with the top of the bread loaf and wrap tightly in saran wrap.  Chill for a minimum of four hours, can be made 24 hours in advance.  Slice in wedges for a round loaf or thick slices for an oblong loaf.

*you can substitute sour cream
**you can substitute Swiss cheese

Larrabee State Park
Relaxing at Larrabee State Park